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Perfect enemies : the religious right, the gay movement, and the politics of the 1990s / John Gallagher and Chris Bull.

By: Contributor(s): Material type: TextTextPublication details: New York, NY : Crown Publishers, 1996.Edition: 1st edDescription: xv, 300 p. ; 22 cmISBN:
  • 0517701987
  • 9780517701980
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 305.9/0664 21
LOC classification:
  • HQ76.8.U5 G355 1996
Contents:
Ch. 1. The Battle Lines Are Drawn: The culture wars of today are rooted in old hostilities -- Ch. 2. Test Market: Oregon becomes the home of the antigay initiative -- Ch. 3. Angels and Demons: Gays and religious conservatives in the 1992 presidential campaign -- Ch. 4. No Special Rights: The success of Colorado's antigay amendment -- Ch. 5. The Stroke of a Pen: How the religious right bested gay groups on the military ban -- Ch. 6. Brushfires: Antigay outbreaks in Cincinnati, Georgia, and Texas -- Ch. 7. Family Values: The promise and peril of gay marriage and parenting -- Ch. 8. Running on Religion: The Republican Revolution and the 1996 presidential race -- Epilogue: From Arms to Armistice - Why the gay rights debate is not a war.
Summary: A political war is raging in the United States between two groups once considered radical, even marginal, by most Americans: the religious right and the gay movement. Perfect Enemies reveals why this conflict has moved to the center of political debate and become a pivotal issue in elections at all levels. In Perfect Enemies, Chris Bull and John Gallagher trace the origins and growth of both groups from the seminal year of 1969, when the Stonewall Riots ushered in the modern gay rights movement and when Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell embarked on direct political action to bring strict biblical interpretation to bear on public policy. The skillful grassroots organizational efforts of both movements, based on a mutual demonization of each side by the other, resulted in growing political clout that developed under the radar of mainstream political commentators - and exploded upon the scene in a series of bitter and, to most Americans, bewildering political conflicts.Summary: From President Clinton's aborted pledge to lift the ban on gays and lesbians in the armed forces to the statewide antigay initiatives in Oregon, Colorado, and Maine, Bull and Gallagher offer the first comprehensive account of the rhetoric and strategies - often remarkably alike - of both sides, and of how the mutual passion of these perfect enemies is influencing electoral politics from the state houses to the White House.
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Books Bibliothèque à livres ouverts Documentaires | Nonfiction 305.906 GAL (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available X33307

Includes index.

Ch. 1. The Battle Lines Are Drawn: The culture wars of today are rooted in old hostilities -- Ch. 2. Test Market: Oregon becomes the home of the antigay initiative -- Ch. 3. Angels and Demons: Gays and religious conservatives in the 1992 presidential campaign -- Ch. 4. No Special Rights: The success of Colorado's antigay amendment -- Ch. 5. The Stroke of a Pen: How the religious right bested gay groups on the military ban -- Ch. 6. Brushfires: Antigay outbreaks in Cincinnati, Georgia, and Texas -- Ch. 7. Family Values: The promise and peril of gay marriage and parenting -- Ch. 8. Running on Religion: The Republican Revolution and the 1996 presidential race -- Epilogue: From Arms to Armistice - Why the gay rights debate is not a war.

A political war is raging in the United States between two groups once considered radical, even marginal, by most Americans: the religious right and the gay movement. Perfect Enemies reveals why this conflict has moved to the center of political debate and become a pivotal issue in elections at all levels. In Perfect Enemies, Chris Bull and John Gallagher trace the origins and growth of both groups from the seminal year of 1969, when the Stonewall Riots ushered in the modern gay rights movement and when Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell embarked on direct political action to bring strict biblical interpretation to bear on public policy. The skillful grassroots organizational efforts of both movements, based on a mutual demonization of each side by the other, resulted in growing political clout that developed under the radar of mainstream political commentators - and exploded upon the scene in a series of bitter and, to most Americans, bewildering political conflicts.

From President Clinton's aborted pledge to lift the ban on gays and lesbians in the armed forces to the statewide antigay initiatives in Oregon, Colorado, and Maine, Bull and Gallagher offer the first comprehensive account of the rhetoric and strategies - often remarkably alike - of both sides, and of how the mutual passion of these perfect enemies is influencing electoral politics from the state houses to the White House.

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